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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the long -- to be global. they make the long-distance connection. the facebook's and the googles to ride on top of that. >> if somebody here in washington sent an e-mail to somebody in kenya, how does that track? >> that is interesting. if you asked that question two years ago, the answer would be different. only recently now that kenya has good connection to the internet rather than rely on satellite intermission. from washington to kenya, it would go through a building in ashford, virginia. 80% sure it would go through lower manhattan. dest is one of the major note for the transatlantic cable. the undersea cables that cross the atlantic and transport this communication. it would go through a single building in london. it is the uk equivalent of ashford in the u.s. i know that because the two cables down the east coast of africa both have their major london.n from there it is a straight shot. it is a fascinating place. it is in the same spot as the ancient report. -- port. this is the place where the international -- >> where are these undersea cables that you referred to earlier? and b
, if we buy something on amazon, if weak bank online, if we do a google search, -- if we bank online, is that information stored on these data centers and throw it may be stored. it is certainly processed -- centers. >> it may be stored. it is certainly processed. the information we create in doing all of these actions, some of it is kind of short-lived information. it goes out. you get back the answer you want. it operates. -- evaporates. other information, when you go and bank online or buy something at amazon and it has to keep a record of that transaction, for its own inventory and your billing records, that stays alive basically forever. >> are these data centers the so-called cloud? >> it is a funny term. it is used in two different ways. in some people's minds, the cloud is anything that happens in the database. it is the magical stuff that happens when you send out this request. your e-mail or your request for a menu to some restaurant, and it comes back. that is a general way of speaking about the digital world. technical people in this industry refine it further. they refer
. and david mihalchik, from google's u.s. cloud computing business. he has helped to establish and expand google's cloud computing footprint. he led their efforts to -- and was part of the team that launched google apps. prior, he was a senior manager with accenture. mark, you have had the luxury of being both inside and at the top level thinking about this and implementing it and we have heard about quicksilver and place. where do you see the next 10 years? if we did this in 10 years, we accomplishments, tell us about the technology changes. >> we are at the cusp of a new productivity model for government. i was excited to hear about the discussion of the first panel. there are four key elements. government that information is abundant, open, and nonproprietary. i had an article a few weeks ago that some of you may have seen, the project at m.i.t. we are at a point now where it is not clear about the collection and dissemination of information. you think about the discussion over the unemployment rate and other things. the crisis project, a couple guys with a cluster of servers, $15,000,
is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card debt, but not if we are not able to pay it back. the current job market and the great recession have made it much worse. i want to have maryann talk about her incredible investigative work into how this affects parents. first of all, what are the biggest concerns without population about this debt, and what are the
was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. roth would read the newspaper and about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for r
that was there in plain sight, but had not been noticed. if you googled the words "great senate" you'll find nothing other than my book. [laughter] nobody had ever noticed a great senate. certainly there are great senators and great filibusters, but a great senate had never been thought about. the reader reviews said of the book said today's senate is not a very good, but in 1960s and 1970s, we had a great senate. i'm delighted they agreed with me. from about 1963 to 1980, we had a great senate in america was that -- that was in the forefront of everything. from holding president nixon accountable and watergate, every a congressman of the senate. in the middle of that senate was robert c. byrd. by the way, for those of you who want to write a book, having a publisher is a good thing. writing a book looking for a publisher later is not a good thing. i was very fortunate. i publisher said to me, all right, we will let you write the book. it cannot be a memoir. all right. can i pop up in the book occasionally? yeah, twice. the publisher said, it is narrated history. you need to tell a story. ok. i can tell s
in the question of somebody wants to know why google can make money and the times can. part of it is because google is a consolidator. they pay the times for a period there is a lot of money is getting cheap. that is the present question. one thing we should also say because it is part of the puzzle, they basically when the times went public, we lost fort shares. your pension fund, there may be some time shares. all of these shares everybody owns as a capitalization of 144 million. all of them which we all alone get to relax five minutes before the board of directors of 14. you will said, who elected the other eight? the b shares are owned by the family trust. they on the b shares. what will happen? will the times go the way of the bank wrapped a journal or not? it used to be sort it would be impossible because the family trusts has done very well. the family -- we're talking four generations of cousins or five generations. i think over 1000 people are involved with a very large number. the crest discusses this. it is possible these people will start to borrow. some of them but they needed t
. you can google it and find out. he left and bought an island in the south pacific in order to launch. now that he is getting billions of government money, now he is able to work out of the cape. he does his falcon nine launches there. i think having the freedom to do this without the standing army that thinks they are there to regulate you, i think that is extremely important, particularly on cost. one of the reasons that the shuttle became so expensive in the early days is they started it too soon after apollo. all those guys seemed to think that they still had jobs to do. maybe i should not have said that in florida. [laughter] but let me just speak for commercial suborbital space flights. those absolutely will not be done on any government sites. the affordability is just totally out of the question. >> hello. thank you for coming this evening. i have been following your career since voyager with some degree of enthusiasm, so it is wonderful to see you in person. my question is directed at commercial space flight, but not for space tourism, but for intercontinental and across cont
] the new space, people using their own money, the new space investors -- allen, musk, bezos, the google guys -- every one of these guys was a little kid during apollo. coincidence? ok, let's move on to spaceshipone. i think paul wanted to do this for legacy. as it turns out, spaceshipone has been a profitable business for them. can you imagine an investor going out into the desert and having people do research where the actuaries, the insurance companies do that hole in one insurance, gave $10 million to paul? they said it could not be done. he went out and did that because of his curiosity. now, you would have thought that $20 million or so -- well, that is just pocket change if you have $126 billion, right? he got almost half his money back. richard branson gave him another couple million to put a virgin on it for two flights. he got half his money back right away. he has been licensing the technology for the tethered reentry and is still turning back on it. that is weird. can you imagine, at nasa doing space research and it is profitable? no, you cannot imagine that. [laughter] you g
voter fraud. you can go on google, fined 20 different tracking experiments that people have performed on these diebold machines, and diebold wears its political heart on its sleeve. they contribute hugely to political campaigns. a paper trail for these machines would be an excellent idea to make sure it is not being hacked, because it has been repeatedly proven that it is embarrassingly easy to hack these diebold machines. that needs to happen. anyway, that is the election reform part of my speech, and i am going to end with another song, that kim and i sang when we were at out at the trail. kim actually thought until she was about 12 years old, she thought the picture of fdr on her grandmother's mantelpiece was her grandfather. [laughter] her grandmother was such a fervent new-dealer that she inoculated came into liberal politics. ♪ o beautiful for spacious skies for amber waves of grain for purple mountain majesties above the fruiten plain america! america! god shed his grace on thee and crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea from sea to shining sea ♪ thank you.
using their own money, the new space investors -- allen, musk, bezos, the google guys -- every one of these guys was a little kid during apollo. coincidence? ok, let's move on to spaceshipone. i think paul wanted to do this for legacy. as it turns out, spaceshipone has been a profitable business for them. can you imagine an investor going out into the desert and having people do research where the actuaries, the insurance companies do that hole in one insurance, gave $10 million to paul? they said it could not be done. he went out and did that because of his curiosity. now, you would have thought that $20 million or so -- well, that is just pocket change if you have $126 billion, right? he got almost half his money back. richard branson gave him another couple million to put a virgin on it for two flights. he got half his money back right away. he has been licensing the technology for the tethered reentry and is still turning back on it. that is weird. can you imagine, at nasa doing space research and it is probable? -- profitable? no, you cannot imagine that. [laughter] you guys a
facebook and google and zynga. these companies are all going public with dueled clash -- dual class shareholders. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about my public companies are disappearing. -- about why public companies are disappearing. >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. there is whole movement to create new shareholders as well as to increase awareness. do you see this movement as the problem, and any change that can come from? >> again, a wonderful impression -- a won
i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale -- auto fill is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. it is a massive issue. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card debt, but not if we are not able to pay it back. the current job market and the great recession have made it much worse. so, the problem. i want to have maryann talk -- marian talk about her incredible investigative work into how this affects parents. first of all, what are the biggest conce
important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 60 -- being an american in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because was was -- because it rallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little ploboy shook on the mailx would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i
at companies that are going public like facebook and google and zynga -- these companies are all going public with dual class shareholders. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about why public companies are disappearing. >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. i have been involved in some shareholder activism -- there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. like environment of degradation. -- environmental degradation. there is whole movement to create new shareholders as well as to increase awareness. do you see this movement as the
, like facebook and google and zynga. and linkedin. these companies are all going public with dual class shareholders. the founders are retaining control. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. they're making sure that short- term shareholders don't have any votes. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about why public companies are disappearing. that's a great question. >> any other questions? >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. i've been involved in shareholder activism. there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. like environmental degradation and labor. there
discovered something that was there in plain sight, but had not been noticed. if you googled the words "great senate" you'll find nothing other than my book. [laughter] nobody had ever noticed a great senate. certainly there are great senators and great filibusters, but a great senate had never been thought about. the reader reviews said of the book said today's senate is not a very good, but in 1960s and 1970s, we had a great senate. i'm delighted they agreed with me. from about 1963 to 1980, we had a great senate in america that was in the forefront of everything. from holding president nixon accountable and watergate, every a congressman of the senate. in the middle of that senate was robert c. byrd. by the way, for those of you who want to write a book, having a publisher is a good thing. writing a book looking for a publisher later is not a good thing. i was very fortunate. i publisher said to me, all right, we will let you write the book. it cannot be a memoir. all right. can i pop up in the book occasionally? yeah, twice. the publisher said, it is narrated history. you need to tell a s
it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a crisis over raising the debt ceiling. republicans demanded some cuts from congress. they agreed to $1 trillion in cuts, they handed over $1.50 trillion to the super committee. because they failed to come up with a deal that could be approved by congress and the president, those automatic cuts go into effect, $1.20 trillion over 10 years. the first cut will go into effect on january 2 of 2013. host: how are the defense sequestration cuts being applied? are we sure? guest: we are not exactly sure, but the law says that every program and activity must be cut by the same percentage. there may be some flexibility, but the understanding is that you have to go across the board and cut everything by the same amount, estimated to be about 9.4% in the case of the pentagon. host: what is on the table for the pentagon? guest: everything can be
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)